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Meet the Dire Straits saxman

Music and tales from the road at Arlington Arts

Trish Lee

Reporter:

Trish Lee

Meet the Dire Straits saxman

ARLINGTON Arts is offering “a night of mindblowing sax and stories from a life in music” with Chris White of Dire Straits, at Saturday. A backstage pass to the music industry is not something that’s easy to come by, but even if you have one it’s unlikely you’ll stumble across a time machine that will let you in on the on-the-road adventures of Jagger, Knopfler, McCartney, Robbie…
You won’t need either for this evening with Chris White. The Dire Straits saxophonist, who has lived outside Newbury for 20 years, has collaborated with all those greats, delivering stunning solos on songs like Romeo and Juliet. After seeing a sax solo on the television, at the age of 14, White was bewitched by the instrument and set about learning his craft on an old one that had been lyingaround for years in a sack at school. Originally working with the National Youth Jazz Orchestra,
he joined up with John Isley, Mark and David Knofler to create the two last and largest of the Dire Straits tours. Since then, the master of rock ’n’ roll, blues and pop has played all over the world, with all kinds of kindred spirits including at the legendary Live Aid and Mandela concerts. The evening, which kicks off at
the Snelsmore venue at 8pm, will include stories and songs directly from Chris White himself. Tickets, priced £14.50, available from the box office, or by phone on (01635) 244 246. Alternatively, you can book online at the What’s On section of www.arlingtonarts.co.uk

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