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A CONTROVERSIAL Adrenaline Trial - offering saline, instead of adrenaline to heart attack patients - will be rolled out by ambulance services across west Berkshire and north Hampshire from Monday February 16.South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) is...

A CONTROVERSIAL Adrenaline Trial - offering saline, instead of adrenaline to heart attack patients - will be rolled out by ambulance services across west Berkshire and north Hampshire from Monday February 16.

South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) is taking part in research about the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrest and among five ambulance trusts in the UK taking part in the pioneering trial, led by the University of Warwick, after scientific evidence suggested that although adrenaline may be better at restarting the heart for a few minutes to hours, it can cause severe brain damage, resulting in death.

During the trial, if a person has a cardiac arrest, they will receive either adrenaline, or saline solution.

Initially involving Reading and Basingstoke ambulance crews, the pilot phase of the Adrenaline Trial, will last until the end of March, following by a full roll-out from April onwards, involving all the trust’s ambulance crews

According to SCAS, In one recent study from the United States, less than half the number of people treated with adrenaline survived to go home from hospital, compared to those that did not receive adrenaline.

This concern has led the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, a worldwide collaboration of resuscitation experts and scientists, to call for urgent studies to find out the effects of adrenaline in cardiac arrest.

In emergency situations, such as cardiac arrest, there are specific legal requirements to ensure that patients’ rights, dignity and safety are protected.

The legal basis for entering a patient into the trial prior to informed consent in an emergency situation is set out in Statutory Instrument 2006 No. 2984, The Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Amendment (No. 2) Regulations 2006.

Members of the public can choose to opt-out of the trial by requesting a stainless steel bracelet which has the words: NO STUDY engraved on it.

Local paramedics will be trained to look for these bracelets, in the same way they do for other medical ID bands.

Anyone wishing to opt out should wear this bracelet for the duration of the trial and will afterwards be contacted by a member of the trial team to inform them that they no longer need to wear the bracelet.

The bracelets can be requested by filling in a form, available via the South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) website, visit http://www.southcentralambulance.nhs.uk/ .

Alternatively, contact the trial team to request a bracelet, telephone 02476 151164, or email: paramedictrial@warwick.ac.uk .

 

 

 

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