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Birds rescued from Sterling Cables tower

Bird sanctuary turns up at Newbury demolition site to save pigeon chicks

Birds rescued from Sterling Cables tower

WORK on the Sterling Cables tower was temporarily halted last week to enable baby birds to be rescued.

Six pigeon chicks were removed from the tower on Tuesday after staff from the Corvid Dawn Wild Bird Sanctuary, based at the Red House in Marsh Benham, were alerted of the impending demolition of the site. 

Founder Aimee Wallis said: “We had a call from a member of the public who was concerned about what was going to happen to the pigeons.

“We thought we’d go down and see if we could rescue as many as possible.” 

Developer Amirantes will build 167 flats in place of the 250ft tower, which will be brought down in around two weeks time. 

Miss Wallis, who has been rescuing birds for five years and set up the Marsh Benham sanctuary two years ago, said she had received a good response from workmen, who had learned a few things about pigeons.

“It was really interesting,” she said.

“The builders changed their opinion on pigeons, how they helped us win the war and that they are domesticated and can’t survive without us.”

Miss Wallis added that the tower had been solely occupied by the birds since it closed in the 1970s.

“It was really good to go in and get those six babies out,” she said, adding that some areas were dangerous to reach and not all of the chicks could be saved. 

“Hopefully the fledglings will be flying by the time it comes down,” she said.

“It will be sad when the building goes, they will have to spread out around the town.”

She said that chicks would go to nice homes as companions and pets and that pigeons were “friendly and affectionate” birds.

Miss Wallis said the builders would stay in touch with the sanctuary to see if any more chicks could be saved before the demolition takes place.  

Take a look at the site using our photo sphere below. 

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Article comments

  • sayitasitis

    15/03/2017 - 18:06

    Couple of good looking birds there.........

    Reply

  • Localgirl1

    15/03/2017 - 17:05

    The real issue is whether pigeons pose a threat to the public and your health. This is very easy to answer: No, they do not. Many websites list the diseases recorded in feral pigeons. How very scary. But let’s put this in context – many more diseases are known in people and their pets. Moreover, all animals carry diseases: the key issue is how often they transfer to humans, and there is little evidence of this happening with feral pigeons. Plus, domestic pigeons often come into contact with feral pigeons but stay perfectly healthy. In other words, feral pigeons simply do not pose a significant health risk. “It’s a non-issue” – something I wish would catch on. … So why all the bad press? Why are pigeons viewed as diseased birds that will kill you if they touch you? Unfortunately it is because all Pest control companies see pigeons as a continuous resource of money and have spread misinformation and exaggerated things – thus spreading fear and ignorance in the public

    Reply

  • quadnewbury

    15/03/2017 - 09:09

    why all the fuss about a few flying rats.

    Reply

    • Corvid Dawn wild bird rescue

      15/03/2017 - 23:11

      An elderly lady comes to the canal every week to feed these birds, since her husband died it's her favourite thing to do, as he used to keep racing pigeons. They know her well and sit on her wheel chair, she says it's therapeutic and doesn't understand how people can hate these birds. They are far from flying rats, latest research shows they can detect cancer cells in the human body.

      Reply

    • Bombey

      15/03/2017 - 12:12

      what a charming person.

      Reply

      • quadnewbury

        15/03/2017 - 17:05

        pigeons are not very charming either, read on......... Pigeons are filthy birds, causing disease and damage. Their droppings are known for triggering human slips and falls, as well as accelerating the aging of structures and statues. This makes it imperative to get rid of pigeons in highly trafficked areas. More seriously, pigeons may carry diseases such as cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, salmonella, food poisoning, and more. Also, their droppings may harbor the growth of fungus, which causes histoplasmosis. Other pests may live on these birds, including fleas, lice, mites, ticks, and other pests

        Reply

        • DavidHameron

          15/03/2017 - 19:07

          That post would be equally accurate if you replaced 'pigeons' with pretty much any other animal.

          Reply

        • Corvid Dawn wild bird rescue

          15/03/2017 - 23:11

          It's just lack of education, I guess some of us like to learn and move forward where as some like to stay where they are, I'd welcome anyone to come to my rescue and learn more about these birds

          Reply

        • Ralph Dring

          15/03/2017 - 22:10

          Doesn't work with Triceratops!

          Reply

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