PBA Accountants founder Clive Adolph retires

Tributes to ‘funny, generous, bubbly, charismatic’ professional

PBA Accountants founder Clive Adolph retires

IT was the end of an era at PBA Accountants in Hungerford when much-loved founding partner Clive Adolph began his well-deserved retirement on January 31.

Clive joined PBA’s parent firm, Freeman Baker Associates, in St Albans back in the 1970s and in 1983 he opened the office in Hungerford, which then rapidly expanded to become PBA Accountants.

In a very short space of time, in a brand new part of the country, he built a business network and gained a wide-reaching
reputation not only for his professional expertise, but also for bringing his larger-than-life personality, cheerful good humour and wealth of experience to get to the bottom of most knotty problems that people could throw at him.

With his speciality of sole traders and partnerships, including the leisure industry, restaurants, hotels and guest-houses, wine bars and café bars, holiday apartments and public houses, it’s no surprise that, when not wearing his accountancy hat, he was also an enthusiastic affiliate member of the British Institute of Inn-Keepers.

It is a credit to Clive that the firm he has built around him over the years now embodies his personality – his sense of fun, his love of tall tales and shaggy dog stories, and his caring, generous nature with a willingness to help everyone, clients and colleagues alike.

He has been as far from the stereotype of a straight-faced, dull, predictable accountant as you can possibly get, and, for PBA, that legacy will continue.

When asked for a word to describe him, these are some of the words his staff used – ‘funny’, ‘generous’, ‘bubbly’, ‘loud’, ‘charismatic’, ‘cuddly’, ‘straight-talking’ ‘legend’ and, most importantly, ‘jolly’.

Clive has always enjoyed a round of golf and has a love of all things involving food and drink, and enjoys getting involved in all sorts of local activities, which means that his great personal bond with the local community will continue, even as he spends more time doing the things he loves.

He will also have more time to take his wife Gaye to Rick Stein’s restaurants in Marlborough and Padstow, spend some time in the sun, and go on a long-awaited cruise.

“It’s true, the place will never be quite the same again,” said remaining partners Paul Pointer and Ruth Hardman.

“He will be sorely missed, but the spirit and ethos of the firm that began with him will continue – PBA Accountants will continue to go from strength to strength, and remain the living proof that accountants need never be boring!”