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Music reprieve for East Ilsley pub



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On Friday (23), High Court judge Mr Justice Sales, sitting in London, banned David Brewerton, the former proprietor of the Crown and Horns pub at Compton Road, East Ilsley, from playing recorded music after he had been caught playing copyrighted tracks on the premises without a music licence.
But Mr Brewerton left the pub at New Year and the ban applies to him personally, not to the pub, so his successor, Sharon Hayes (pictured right), says people will still be able to enjoy soothing tunes with their pints.
Mrs Hayes said: “I don’t know much about what happened when David [Brewerton] was here, but I know they left after the New Year’s party.
“The pub was then closed for a month and I reopened at the end of January in an attempt to turn it around. We are currently in the process of having the space measured up to apply for a licence, but in the mean time, we are free to play music for our customers.”
Apart from the ban on playing music at any of the pubs he runs, Mr Brewerton also faces legal costs of £1,637, which must be paid within 14 days of the judgement.
Mr Brewerton was not present in the court when the judgement was made.
The judge ordered him not to play any more music at any premises he runs until he brings his music licence up to date. Failure to obey the order and turn any premises he runs into a music-free zone until all licence fees are brought up to date would be regarded as contempt of court, the penalties for which can be fines of up to £10,000 and up to six months in prison.
The order was imposed after the judge heard that he was caught playing music on the premises when he did not hold a licence from music royalties collectors Phonographic Performance Ltd (PPL).
One of PPL's inspectors attended the premises on September 24 last year and heard tracks being played including 'No Matter What' by Boyzone, 'Angels' by Robbie Williams, and 'Just A Feeling' by Maroon 5.
PPL spokesperson Clare Goldie said: "PPL is the UK-based music licensing company which licenses recorded music for broadcast, online and public performance use. Established in 1934, PPL carries out this role on behalf of thousands of record company and performer members.”



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