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Conservatives select Newbury candidate

"It’s an incredible honour to be selected to represent my home"

Sarah Bosley

sarah.bosley@newburynews.co.uk

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Conservatives select Newbury candidate

West Berkshire’s Conservatives have chosen their candidate for next month’s general election.

Laura Farris was selected to replace Richard Benyon after a vote last night (Sunday).

Mrs Farris is the daughter of former Newbury Conservative MP Michael McNair-Wilson, who served from 1974 to 1992.

She took to Twitter to announce the news, saying it was “an incredible honour to be selected” as the candidate of “the place where I grew up, am raising my family and which holds such a deep emotional resonance”.

A former political journalist who has also worked for BBC News and Reuters and has previously written for the New York Times and Huffington Post, Mrs Farris is a barrister specialising in employment and equality law.

Mrs Farris grew up in the constituency and now lives with her family nearby. She previously stood as a Parliamentary candidate in Leyton and Wanstead (East London) in the 2017 general election.

Richard Benyon recently announced he wouldn’t be standing again this year, having served as Newbury’s MP since 2005. 

The Liberal Democrat candidate is the council’s opposition leader Lee Dillon.

Councillor Steve Masters is standing for the Green Party and solicitor David Jabbari is standing for the Brexit Party.

The Labour Party candidate, who was also announced this weekend, is Park House School teacher, James Wilder.

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Article comments

  • aslapper

    12/11/2019 - 00:11

    Yes - I wouldn't support a Tory candidate anyway! However, to see the triumphalism of giving the candidature to someone who has sought election elsewhere before, in front of another who has served the Tory party well in local council and inhabits the area, just epitomises what is wrong with the selection process and the Tory Party in particular. Opportunity knocks for the privileged daughter of an MP over someone with West Berkshire in their soul - why am I surprised and disappointed?

    Reply

    • NoisyNortherner

      12/11/2019 - 10:14

      I mean, isn't that the Tory way? Don't pick the right person, pick the person who has the connections. See also: Hiring a former pole dancer to give "IT advice".

      Reply

  • NoisyNortherner

    11/11/2019 - 15:45

    Under normal circumstances, Laura would potentially make a decent MP. Unfortunately, a vote for her would keep the current bumbling idiot in Downing St, along with his heartless enablers in the other arms of government. More's the pity. The Conservatives have had almost ten years to address the societal ills that they seem to care so much about, and what have they done? They've reduced local council funding, cut police numbers, reduced funding for the fire service, cut per-pupil funding at schools in real terms, continued to support environmentally damaging fossil fuels, embarked on a massive road building scheme, decided to press on with HS2, and so on. The message is clear: If you're not well off, the Tories couldn't give a damn what you have to say and you can do them a favour by dying quickly.

    Reply

    • Mister Cat

      12/11/2019 - 11:36

      I think you misunderstand how funding works. Governments get the money to pay for things by taxing us. If you want a better police service, a better NHS , better local services , better schools you can have them. You just have to pay. So if you wish you had been paying perhaps an extra £500 per month in tax then why didn't you say. The fundamental difference between Labour and Conservatives is that one will spend and leave us to pay the bill and the other will create a strong economy so we can all afford it. I will let you work out which is which.

      Reply

      • NoisyNortherner

        12/11/2019 - 13:06

        And yet under their stewardship, Britain has been the slowest country to recover from the 2008 crash out of the G7 (if it ever really recovered at all). Austerity was never about balancing the books, it was a weak excuse to shrink the government in an ideologically driven crusade. Slash the top tax rate, punish those on the bottom rung of society, and make claiming social security benefits so daunting that people are literally dying while waiting for assessments from the DWP. Add to that their miserable efforts to address the housing crisis by indirectly funding buy to let, selling off publicly owned assets for a fraction of their value, Windrush, Grenfell, take your fucking pick. The Tories are a disgrace.

        Reply

        • Mister Cat

          12/11/2019 - 15:05

          So I guess you are not going to stump up to make things better. Just complain about what doesn't suit you.

          Reply

        • NoisyNortherner

          12/11/2019 - 15:18

          On the contrary. I'd have no problem paying more tax if it went towards areas that benefit wider society. It's a shame that there's a whole social strata who have the means and the funds to avoid paying any tax at all though. That's not to mention companies who are quite happy to ship their profits offshore to avoid paying their fair share. Not to mention the amount of people getting paid so little by said companies that the volume of in-work benefits being claimed is higher than it has ever been.

          Reply

        • Mister Cat

          12/11/2019 - 15:54

          I do hate to say this as, even though we are clearly diametrically opposed politically, you are definitely a smart and articulate chap … But it is the standard Labour rant of everything is the fault of some mythical elite. I really think that if business is allowed to thrive then more ordinary people get paid. That does benefit society as a whole.

          Reply

        • NoisyNortherner

          13/11/2019 - 10:45

          A successful economy of course requires business to thrive. Left unchecked however, profit comes before people. See Philip Green, Amazon, etc. Strong regulation is needed if capitalism is to survive and I remain convinced that a combination of leaving Europe with the Tories in charge will see a bonfire of workers rights and a surge in the sort of unreliable work that is causing problems as of late. Classing people as "self-employed" when they work for huge corporations is a way around the current regulations, and while zero hours contracts have a place, they are far too prevalent where people need stable hours and a steady income. I suspect we'll have to agree to disagree in this case.

          Reply

  • brunin the bear

    11/11/2019 - 15:36

    Wonderful news, good luck Laura!

    Reply