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Solar Eclipse 2021: What time and how to view it in the UK



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A PARTIAL solar eclipse will be visible across the UK tomorrow (Thursday, June 10).

It is the biggest partial solar eclipse since 2015 and will start at 10.07am and reach its maximum at 11.14am. It will finish at 12.26pm.

These times will vary very slightly across the UK and some areas, further north, will see a third of the Sun's light blocked by the Moon.

Eclipse in Newbury 2015 Picture: Phil Cannings
Eclipse in Newbury 2015 Picture: Phil Cannings

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon comes between the Earth and the Sun. Because they are aligned, the Moon leaves a shadow on Earth.

Solar eclipses vary according to where the Moon is in its elliptical orbit. If it is at its closest point to Earth then it can block out most of the Sun’s rays – a total eclipse. But if it is at its furthest point from earth it doesn't block out all the light, but leaves a red ring visible – this is known as an 'annular eclipse'.

People in Greenland, northern Canada and Russia will witness an annular eclipse – 89 per cent of the Sun will be obscured – but in the UK we will see a partial eclipse – which means we will be covered by the Moon's outer shadow, also known as the penumbra.

Never look directly at the Sun
Never look directly at the Sun
You can get special glasses to view a solar eclipse
You can get special glasses to view a solar eclipse

Remember, never look directly into the Sun, its ultraviolet rays can permanently damage your vision.

You can use special solar eclipse glasses – do not use regular binoculars, cameras or telescopes – or you can make your own projector with a piece of card and a piece of paper.

Form a small hole in the middle of the card and hold it up to the Sun with the piece of paper behind it. As the Moon passes in front of the Sun you will be able to see the shape of the Sun projected onto the piece of paper.

Eclipse in Newbury in 2015 Picture: Phil Cannings
Eclipse in Newbury in 2015 Picture: Phil Cannings

You can watch the solar eclipse live on YouTube here:



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